Introduction To Digital Humanities

Structuring and Annotating Data Archives for Analysis

Claudia von Vacano

 Claudia von Vacano

Claudia von Vacano is the Digital Humanities at Berkeley Project Director. Claudia played a core role in bringing the Social Sciences Data Laboratory (D-Lab) from its conceptual blueprint three years ago to a thriving cross-domain center serving data-intensive research needs in departments and professional schools across campus. She holds a Master’s degree from Stanford University in Learning, Design, and Technology. Her Master’s thesis was a digital humanities project called Expressions of Central America, which received recognition and funding from the U.S. Department of Education. Her doctoral work is in Policy, Organizations, Measurement, and Evaluation from UC Berkeley, Graduate School of Education.

Building a Personal Website in Wordpress

Rochelle Terman

Rochelle Terman

Rochelle is a Social Science Postdoctoral Fellow at the Center for International Security and Cooperation at Stanford University. She received her Ph.D. in Political Science with a designated emphasis in Gender & Women’s Studies at the University of California, Berkeley in 2016. Her research examines international norms, gender and advocacy, with a focus on the Muslim world, using a mix of quantitative, qualitative and computational methods. Her current book project investigates resistance and defiance to international norms and advocacy.

Data Workflows and Network Analysis

Christopher Church

 Chris Church

Chris Church is an assistant professor of history at the University of Nevada, Reno where he is co-director of NDAD (The Nevada Center for Data and Design in the Digital Humanities) . Before joining the history department at UNR, he worked as the Program Coordinator for the Social Sciences Data Lab (D-Lab) and the Digital Humanities Coordinator for the history department at the University of California, Berkeley.


He is a cultural historian and digital historian of the French colonial world who specializes in disasters, nationalism, and social movements in the 19th and 20th centuries. He employs new methods from data science and the digital humanities to answer age-old questions about the relationship between citizens, the public sphere, and the state. His intellectual interests include colonialism, citizenship, and environmental history, as well as databases, GIS, scripting, and web design. In addition to traditional history courses on French history and natural disasters, he has also taught courses and workshops on Python, Network Analysis, Data Management, and Web Design.

Maps for Humanists: an introduction to geographic data, visualization, and analysis

Patty Frontiera

 Patty Frontiera

Patty Frontiera is the D-Lab Academic Coordinator. Patty received her Ph.D. in Environmental Planning from UC Berkeley where her dissertation explored the application and effectiveness of generalized spatial representations in geographic information retrieval. Her work has focused on the design and development of web-based environmental planning and information systems. Specific areas of interest include web mapping, spatial databases, environmental informatics and the development of web-based geospatial analysis tools.

Susan Powell

Susan is the GIS & Map Librarian in the Earth Sciences & Map Library at Cal. Before coming to Berkeley she was a GIS Specialist at the Yale University Library. She has masters’ degrees in both Geography and Library Science from Indiana University, and is interested in new mapping technologies, data accessibility, and Mongolia, among other things.

Computational Text Analysis

Teddy Roland

 Teddy Roland

Teddy Roland is a PhD student in English at UC Santa Barbara. His research focuses on the contested and uneven movement of avant-garde forms across twentieth-century literary magazines. In conjunction with archival research and close reading, evidence toward those humanistic research questions has incorporated computational findings from natural language processing and machine learning. Previously, Teddy was a Lecturer at UC Berkeley and Coordinator for Digital Literary Study with the Digital Humanities at Berkeley Initiative. He received his MA from the University of Chicago in 2014.

 

Laura K. Nelson

 Laura K. Nelson

Laura K. Nelson received her PhD in sociology from the University of California, Berkeley. She has an MA from UC Berkeley and a BA from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. She is currently a postdoctoral fellow at Digital Humanities @ Berkeley, developing a course for undergraduates on computational text analysis in the humanities and social sciences.

She uses computational methods and open source tools, principally automated text analysis, to study social movements, culture, gender, institutions, and organizations. She is particularly interested in developing computational tools that can bolster the way social scientists do inductive and theory-driven research.

DH in the Classroom

Scott Paul McGinnis

 Claudia von Vacano

Scott Paul McGinnis is a Ph.D. candidate in history, one of the coordinators for the DH Working Group, and a GSR for DH at Berkeley and the D-Lab. His dissertation research seeks to understand the technical dimensions of the practice of history in early China, and he is in the process of creating an experimental digital edition of an early Chinese historical work, the first-century Han shu, in collaboration with the Mark Twain Papers and Project with support from the DH at Berkeley Collaborative Research Grants. Through DH at Berkeley and the D-Lab, he offers general consulting in digital humanities and specialized consulting in digital editions and the XML ecosystem, and he teaches workshops about these topics here on campus and at DHSI in Victoria.