Category: English

“The Bay Area in the 1970s: A Digital Archive”

“The Bay Area in the 1970s” is a DH-oriented research project in collaboration with the Bancroft Library and in synch with the American Studies program. The larger project will capitalize on, and work to curate, the excellent Bay Area-related primary source holdings of the Berkeley library system, and will be linked to a course (also titled “The Bay Area in the Seventies”) to be regularly offered in the American Studies program.

Read more

Louisiana Slave Conspiracies

We are a multidisciplinary research project dedicated to preserving, digitizing, transcribing, translating, and analyzing manuscripts from three Louisiana slave conspiracies. We are building a digital archive that will present these French and Spanish manuscripts alongside original transcription and English translation. The centerpiece of the archive will be the testimonies taken from slaves and their allies in the conspiracy.

Read more

Digital Humanities for Medieval Studies

This course serves as an introduction to the practice of digital humanities in the field of Medieval Studies. The goals of the course are threefold: --to explore the conceptual terrain of digital humanities and to become familiar with debates about digital humanities; --to learn a series of basic skills in digital humanities practice, including tools for digitizing manuscripts (XML and TEI); text analysis and statistics (Voyant, Wordhoard, and others); text analysis in Python; stylometry; topic modeling; network analysis and visualization; 3D modeling; and resources for publishing and presenting research; --to explore the extensive world of digital humanities projects in Medieval Studies, in a range of fields from literature to history to art history to musicology to manuscript studies and more.

Read more

Kathleen Donegan

Kathleen Donegan (Ph.D. American Studies, Yale University) writes and teaches about literature and culture in early America, from New World encounters through the first decades of the republic.  She is the author of Seasons of Misery: Catastrophe and Colonial Settlement in Early America (Penn, 2014), a book about the deeply unsettling history of early English colonial settlement in Native America.

Read more

Slavery and Conspiracy

This is a multidisciplinary seminar on the law and literature of slave conspiracy. Students will be reading novels and stories by authors such as Martin Delany and Herman Melville alongside contemporary newspapers, confessions, warrants, witness depositions, and trial transcripts. The course will also be reading history and theory by Peter Brooks, Gwendolyn Midlo Hall, Jill Lepore, Michel-Rolph Trouillot, and Gordon Wood. Students will choose between writing a research paper and working on a collaborative digital project related to one of the conspiracies covered in the course.

Read more

Imogen Forbes-Macphail

Imogen Forbes-Macphail is a graduate student in the English Faculty and a coordinator of the Literature and Digital Humanities Townsend Working Group. She works primarily on the relationship between literature and mathematics in the nineteenth-century, with a particular interest in the writings of Ada Lovelace, Charles Babbage, Gerard Manley Hopkins, and Samuel Taylor Coleridge. 

Read more

R.D. Perry

R.D. Perry works primarily in the literature of late-medieval England, from Chaucer, Gower, and Langland, through to Hoccleve and Lydgate, up to the transitional figures of Dunbar and Skelton.  He also has interests in the influence of medieval philosophy on 20th-Century Critical Theory and philosophy and on the religious culture of medieval England after the Fourth Lateran Council.

Read more

Maura Nolan

Professor Nolan works on late medieval English literature, with a special focus on the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, and the vexed relationship between the “medieval” and the “Renaissance.”  She is especially interested in defining and articulating the role of the aesthetic in late medieval vernacular literature, particularly in relation to variable cultural understandings of sensation and cognition.

Read more

Scott Saul

Scott Saul is a historian and critic who has written for The New York Times, Harper's MagazineThe Nation, and other publications. The author of Becoming Richard Pryor and Freedom Is, Freedom Ain't: Jazz and the Making of the Sixties, he is also the creator of Richard Pryor's Peoria, an extensive digital companion to his biography of the comedian. He teaches courses in American literature and history at Berkeley.

Read more

Bryan Wagner

Bryan Wagner is Associate Professor in the English Department at UC Berkeley. He received a PhD from the University of Virginia before coming to Berkeley in 2002. His research focuses on African American expression in the context of slavery and its aftermath, and he has secondary interests in legal history and critical theory.

Read more

Pages